From the Archives: Crispin Glover Interview

From the Archives: Crispin Glover Interview

I have been very fortunate to write only about films and people I like and admire. Under magazine editors like Chris Alexander at Fangoria, I have had total freedom to wander whatever my heart led me. When I first got into journalism, I created a dream list of people I would like to interview, and atop that list was Crispin Hellion Glover. While many in the industry are relatively easy to access via management or the usual channels, Glover is famously reclusive and media shy. Despite long presentations of his books and films in person, he is rarely interviewed, and usually when he is it is by email. In mid 2011 I took a long shot and sent a conversation request via his website. Months later I got an email from Glover himself saying he had done some research on me and wanted to talk.

The resulting phone conversation stretched to almost four hours, and we touched on a variety of aspects of his life and career. The piece I did for Fangoria ran over two issues #315 (July 2012) and #316 (August 2012), but even over two installments it had to be tremendously trimmed and cherry picked to fit into the allotted space. But there is so much depth to this conversation, and so much is revealed that I didn’t want to relegate the interview to print magazine archives in a truncated form.

So here is the full unedited transcript of my conversation with Crispin on January 4, 2012. It remains one of my fondest experiences thus far in my career, and I am happy to share it with you in its purest form. I have included the intro as seen in Fangoria, and the rest is the uncut conversation. On to the show…

Crispin Glover isn’t as unlikely an icon as some would imagine. A gifted child born in New York City into a family of entertainers, Glover entered this world in 1964 with “the business” in his blood, and it wasn’t long before he, of his own volition, gave acting a try in his early teens. After reluctantly calling in sick for his first paid gig in a Coca-Cola commercial (stomach flu), the young thespian tried his hand in a stage presentation of THE SOUND OF MUSIC, followed by an appearance in a pilot for the ill-fated television show THE BEST OF TIMES. While honing his acting chops at exclusive Mirman School in Los Angeles, Glover whittled what little free time he had reading (Bradbury and Vonnegut were favs), listening to classical music, and populating stacks of Mead spiral notebooks with short stories and prose. He didn’t know it at the time, but the humble East Coast transplant would one day become a cult cinema legend, a key figure in actor rights, and one of film’s most unique originals, blazing a path of arcane artistry across all genres and platforms.